The DIY Couturier: 21 Tips to Keep Your Shit Together When You're Depressed.

rosalindrobertson:

A while ago, I penned a fairly angry response to something circulating on the internet – the 21 Habits of Happy People. It pissed me off beyond belief, that there was an inference that if you weren’t Happy, you simply weren’t doing the right things.

I’ve had depression for as long as I can…

yearslater:

golfcake:

Krisatomic’s new drawing hits home. “This is just how my face looks.”

my life since high school much?

gpoy 

yearslater:

golfcake:

Krisatomic’s new drawing hits home. “This is just how my face looks.”

my life since high school much?

gpoy 

(via everythinglovely)

npr:

The It-Doesn’t-Matter Suit: Sylvia Plath’s Lovely, Little-Known Vintage Children’s Book | Brain Pickings
A charming cautionary tale about the perils of self-consciousness.
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Probably better than being overly self-involved. — tanya b.

npr:

The It-Doesn’t-Matter Suit: Sylvia Plath’s Lovely, Little-Known Vintage Children’s Book | Brain Pickings

A charming cautionary tale about the perils of self-consciousness.

===

Probably better than being overly self-involved. — tanya b.

(via teachingliteracy)

soft-kitten:

The Ronettes and awesome girls in the audience! 

(via sundryedtomatos)

this video is played AT LEAST twice a day in our home

elgin-marbles:

The Inspiration for the original “Rosie the Riveter” — Geraldine Hoff Doyle

Rosie’s story began in the 1940s, when the 17-year-old Doyle was working at a metal factory in Ann Arbor, Michigan. A visiting United Press International photographer snapped a pic of her on the job.

The image was then used by artist J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War II. As the Washington Post writes, “For millions of Americans throughout the decades since World War II, the stunning brunette in the red and white polka-dot bandanna was Rosie the Riveter.”

A later “Rosie the Riveter” interpretation, done by Norman Rockwell, was featured on the Saturday Evening Post [on May 29,] 1943. Ultimately, the idea of “Rosie the Riveter” came to represent all female factory workers at the time.

But for decades, Doyle had no idea that her likeness was used on the original poster. The New York Times writes:

Mrs. Doyle was unaware of the poster’s existence until 1982, when, while thumbing through a magazine, she saw a photograph of it and recognized herself. Her daughter said that the face on the poster was her mother’s, but that the muscles were not.

“She didn’t have big, muscular arms,” [her daughter Stephanie] Gregg said. “She was 5-foot-10 and very slender. She was a glamour girl. The arched eyebrows, the beautiful lips, the shape of the face — that’s her.”

According to the Wall Street Journal, Doyle quit after just one week at the factory where her picture was made famous. “She later married a dentist and raised a family in Lansing, Mich.,” the Journal reports.

I prefer Norman Rockwell’s interpretation. Notice what her foot is on. As a side note, Rockwell’s interpretation of Rosie was inspired by Michelangelo’s Isaiah:

image

(Source: friarpark, via vintascope)

briadru4:

bluestockingsredux:

Amazingly, Jackie Kennedy was not simply trying to escape the car that her husband had just been shot in. In possibly her most badass moment in a lifetime of badassery, she jumped over the back of the car to retrieve the piece of the President’s skull that had been blown off.
Her husband had been shot in front of her, she was covered in his blood, she’d just watched a piece of his skull go flying through the air and her first thought was “Oh, crap. He might need that. Better go get it.”

That’s probably one of my favorite moments of history.
I mean, obviously not Kennedy being SHOT. That’s horrible and tragic. But the fact that Jackie just immediately flew towards the back of the car, on instinct, to grab a piece of his skull/brain. Like, shit, if that’s not love, I don’t know WHAT is.

Her whole life during this time period is just fascinating in a really morbid way. Like how she just stayed at the White House way longer than she should havel 

briadru4:

bluestockingsredux:

Amazingly, Jackie Kennedy was not simply trying to escape the car that her husband had just been shot in. In possibly her most badass moment in a lifetime of badassery, she jumped over the back of the car to retrieve the piece of the President’s skull that had been blown off.

Her husband had been shot in front of her, she was covered in his blood, she’d just watched a piece of his skull go flying through the air and her first thought was “Oh, crap. He might need that. Better go get it.”

That’s probably one of my favorite moments of history.

I mean, obviously not Kennedy being SHOT. That’s horrible and tragic. But the fact that Jackie just immediately flew towards the back of the car, on instinct, to grab a piece of his skull/brain. Like, shit, if that’s not love, I don’t know WHAT is.

Her whole life during this time period is just fascinating in a really morbid way. Like how she just stayed at the White House way longer than she should havel 

(via briamei)

earth-song:

Spectacled Bear by *stuviper

earth-song:

Spectacled Bear by *stuviper

(via ifstrangerstouch)

"not being the babest person in the world creates a nice barrier. the people who talk to you are the people who are interested in you. it must be a big burden in some ways to look that way and be in public."

lena dunham on why she wouldn’t want to be a victoria’s secret model (via sarazucker)

(Source: New York Magazine, via thatkindofwoman)

nevver:

Spoiler alert

nevver:

Spoiler alert